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Resources: COSEE Conference Resources

In an effort to increase the visibility of the National COSEE Network within target audiences, the COSEE Central Coordinating Office is working to establish an organized COSEE presence at various national science and education society conferences and meetings including:

Ocean Scientists (American Geophysical Union – AGU; Ocean Sciences – AGU, ASLO, TOS)
Diversity - Students Underrepresented/Underserved in STEM disciplines (Society for Advancing Chicanos and Native Americans in Sciences – SACNAS)
Science Education (National Science Teachers Association – NSTA)

Posters and other conference presentation materials are displayed here.


03.30.2010    
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    The Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence: Central Gulf of Mexico has implemented a five-day Teacher Scientist Institute in several states each year during its first and second grant periods. These Institutes are designed to be similar in format and provide abundant opportunities for scientists and teachers to work together, learn each others’ cultures, and develop a relationship for future work together. However each Co-Principal Investigator is responsible for implementation in his or her own state, which leads to variability in the teacher scientist institute as implemented across the Gulf Coast. Some variability is related to differences among available facilities and coastal habitats. However, institute schedules and participant expectations introduced in each state also contributed to differences in the Teacher Scientist Institutes implemented across the coast during early years of COSEE:CGOM.

    This presentation relates to variations among Institutes resulting from differences in expectations of teachers versus scientists. While the institute in one state assumed all teachers and scientists were present and participating in all activities from the initiation through the completion of the workshop, others maintained more relaxed expectations of scientists – in some cases scientists came in for a day to conduct a field activity, in some cases scientists were present most of the week, but came and went according to other items on their agendas. Data presented elsewhere show differences in teachers’ experiences in these different scenarios. Limited evaluation data also indicated improvements in scientists’ experiences when they spent more time following the same schedule as teachers. This presentation will describe differences in the Teacher Scientist Institutes held in various states, provide representative comments from the evaluations and describe changes that have been made in the Teacher Scientist Institute schedules to enhance scientists’ education and outreach experiences.

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  • 03.15.2010     Chris Parsons and Janice McDonnell
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    How are ocean scientists engaged in education and outreach? Are they contributing to websites, teaching students, sharing their knowledge with classroom teachers, all of the above? How do they view their role in education and outreach? What do they need to get more involved and do a better job? To support the COSEE mission of engaging scientists and educators to transform ocean science education, COSEE-NOW team members have since 2004 been conducting an annual online scientist survey (most recently with the aid of ASLO).

    This presentation by Chris Parsons, the COSEE-NOW evaluator and principal of Word Craft, offers a summary of six years of results on ocean scientists’ involvement in, practices and needs related to education and outreach. During the presentation, Chris will also highlight differences in responses between current ocean scientists and graduate students in the U.S. and internationally.

    COSEE-NOW (Networked Ocean World) is an online COSEE dedicated to virtually bring together ocean scientists and educators.

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    03.12.2010     Christy Herren, Annette deCharon, J. Theodore Repa, Amy Holt Cline, Carla Companion, and Deb Goodwin
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    "Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime."
    – Chinese Proverb.


    Can we teach scientists to "fish" for their audiences from all walks of life, and enjoy the experience so much that they contribute to informal education for a lifetime? Using cutting-edge multimedia tools and a novel workshop model, COSEE-Ocean Systems is helping scientists better communicate with the public by working with informal science educators. In conjunction with Informal Science Education Centers in the New England region, we will share a new workshop model designed to help scientists “bait the hook” and effectively translate their current ocean-climate research via informal educator teams into digestible and appropriate messages that appeal to a wide range of audiences frequenting ISEs.

    The workshop model is based on a dynamic and visual process of group concept mapping that evolves over the course of the multi-day event. At the end of the workshop, each participant has multiple “take home products” - unique and customized concept maps (see figure) hyperlinked to educational assets (images, videos, news items, and curriculum resources). Peer-to-peer community building and mutual professional benefits are key to the sustainability of this collaboration. Informal educators benefit not only by gaining knowledge from and interacting closely with their scientist teammates, but also by delving into the thought processes behind the scientists' discoveries. Scientists benefit from learning about educational pedagogy as well as the “real world” interests of their citizen audiences – handy skills for successfully fulfilling those NSF broader impact requirements with meaningful results! Post-interviews, evaluation data, and concept map products will be presented, as well as materials (fishing gear!) to help you run your own scientist-educator collaboration workshop in your home institution. Grab your fishing poles!

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    03.03.2010     J. Theodore Repa, Annette deCharon, and Christy Herren
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    Error is a given when trying to communicate the relationships among complicated science concepts. Communication research has identified at least 11 sources of error that the scientist needs to minimize: error due to the sender, encoding, the message, the channel of communication, the receiver, decoding, the audience, the physical environment, the social environment, the political and economic environment, and/or time.

    COSEE-OS has developed a professional development model for scientists and online tools to minimize these eleven sources of error (not eliminate them because that is not an achievable goal). Particular attention is paid to minimizing the encoding and decoding sources of error through the use of online concept mapping tools which graphically communicate the scientist's logic of how they think, non-linearly, about the relationships among their various concepts of interest.

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    03.03.2010     Ari Daniel Shapiro, Janice D. McDonnell, C. Sage Lichtenwalner, and James A. Yoder
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    The Ocean Gazing podcast is one of COSEE NOW’s primary educational outreach tools. The aim is to provide scientists with a forum for telling their stories about ocean observing science and the broader impacts that science is having on people beyond academic institutions.

    In each biweekly episode, Ocean Gazing integrates interviews, ambient sounds gathered in the field and the lab, music, audio recordings from listeners (from children to adults), and the unveiling of a mystery sound. The scientists have said they enjoy participating in the podcast as a mechanism for making their science accessible and promoting the work they do in an engaging and accurate manner. We have between 300 and 400 downloads for each episode, and we are actively promoting Ocean Gazing on Facebook. We've created CDs containing the first 26 episodes and high school curriculum companion pieces for a handful of the podcasts. These are being distributed to scientists and educators.

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    03.03.2010     Linda Duguay, Peggy Fong, Peter Tuddenham, Gwen Noda, Lynn Whitley, Jane Lee, Linda Chilton, and Patricia Kwon
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    COSEE-West conducted online workshops to disseminate ocean science content to larger audiences than could be reached using in-person activities. Teachers and educators not served by a COSEE Center could be reached through distance learning. Three different online workshop models were created. A base model had online presentations by scientists, with scientists available to answer participants’ questions online. A professor model had scientists presenting ocean science content during an undergraduate course, followed by an online workshop in which undergraduates served as mentors for ocean science content (supervised by the professor and graduate students) and teacher leaders served as pedagogy mentors to educator participants. An undergraduate field research model built upon the professor model: scientists presented ocean science content to undergraduate students during a field research course, followed by an online workshop in which undergraduates conducted field research a nd exchanged findings online with participants. Participants also had an opportunity to observe field research being conducted.

    Data indicates that scientists, students, teachers, and educators all benefited from these online workshops in their roles as participants and mentors. These online workshop models can also be successfully transferred to other institutions.

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    03.03.2010     Linda Duguay, Peggy Fong, Peter Tuddenham, Gwen Noda, Lynn Whitley, Jane Lee, Linda Chilton, and Patricia Kwon
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    COSEE-West and other COSEE Centers have conducted a variety of education outreach activities, including one day professional development workshops with scientists and educators. Although the literature indicates limited benefits of one day professional development workshops for implementation of science content in the classroom, there are other benefits to these workshops. One day workshops enable scientists and educators with time constraints to participate in professional development. Educators are able to learn content and hands-on curricula quickly on a particular topic. One day workshops allow Centers to host a series of workshops so that a wide range of scientific topics can be covered. One day workshops are easier for the Center's informal science education centers to coordinate with their existing public education outreach offerings, and thus successfully increase ocean sciences education outreach for the general public.

    COSEE-West has successfully incorporated these benefits in hosting their series of one day lectures and workshops. Data from scientists, educators, and students demonstrate that ocean science content learned from these workshops has been used in the classroom, science competitions, and other education outreach programs. MORE >>
    03.03.2010     C. Sage Lichtenwalner, Janice D. McDonnell, Chris Parsons, Laura Dunbar, and Scott M. Glenn
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    Ocean observing systems (OOS) provide a wealth of real-time data that can be put to use in classrooms and informal learning centers. This presents an exciting opportunity to connect students and the public to real-world science. Additionally, when students analyze real-time data in structured learning environments, it can help them improve their inquiry skills while exposing them to relevant ocean science topics to increase their level of ocean knowledge.

    However, building tools to help students, teachers and the public access and understand real-time data effectively presents many logistical and design challenges. Data displays must be presented clearly using age-appropriate intuitive interfaces. Science content and visualizations must be constructed in ways that address how people learn and build upon the prior knowledge of the end-user. And above all, the information presented must be made meaningful for the intended audience, ideally through the use of engaging and personally relevant stories.

    To address these challenges, a collaborative group of scientists, classroom and informal educators, education researchers, and data translators have worked together to develop several novel approaches to bring real-time OOS data to classroom and public audiences. This team was brought together by the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence Networked Ocean World (COSEE NOW), a virtual community of scientists and educators seeking to foster collaborations that will engage participants in the development of new products that promote the Ocean Literacy essential concepts.

    A review of audience and stakeholder needs assessments informed the development of several prototype projects, including: 1) real-time ocean data worksheets that provide an quick means to integrate data into the classroom, 2) extended curriculum units that tie real ocean data with current science research, and 3) museum displays of OOS datasets presented in a narrative structure. These projects are developed using an iterative design process, in which formative assessments are used to steer future development.

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    03.02.2010     Brian M. McCann, Ph.D. and Susan C. Ross, Ph.D.
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    The Centers for Ocean Science Excellence: Central Gulf of Mexico (COSEE:CGOM) engages scientists in summer institutes in two ways: (1) During a week-long face-to-face experience and (2) During a three-week long on-line experience. In the face-to-face experience, scientists and teachers are teamed together to develop lessons/materials the teachers can take back to their classrooms. During the on-line experience the scientists prepare a presentation using a variety of interactive electronic formats and also engage with the teachers through a discussion board. While the teachers prepare lesson plans/material based on the content presented by the scientists, they have the opportunity to ask questions of the scientists.

    This study builds on previous evaluation efforts conducted by the center by:

    Examining which presentations were perceived effective and valuable by the teachers and how the scientists that conducted them viewed the experience;
    Examining the perceived impact on the scientist's research, teaching and/or service because of their participation in COSEE:CGOM programs; and
    Determining what the scientist's veiws are on the benefits or drawbacks to engaging educators.

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    03.02.2010     Catherine Halversen
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    Partnerships between scientists and educators have been occurring as mechanisms for science education reform over the last two decades. The work they have done together includes: scientists providing science content as part of professional development for teachers and development of curriculum; and graduate students teaching lessons in K-12 classrooms. In most of these instances, the scientists provide their science expertise, which the educators use to ensure the scientific accuracy and credibility of their activities.

    For this project, informal science education institutions (ISEIs) are explored as venues for scientists to communicate with the public and engage in a different model of partnership. In this instance, ocean scientists and educators develop new understanding and practice, as they co-teach a college course.

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    03.02.2010     J. Hare, L.K. Smith, S. Buhr, O.P Persson, C.W. Fairall, S. Lynds, and M.S. McCaffrey
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    The CIRES Education and Outreach Program offers a suite of programs aligned with the Essential Principals of Ocean Sciences (EPOS) and the Essential Principles of Climate Sciences (EPCS). One such program, the COSEE West – Colorado Collaborative, provides a means by which scientists can participate in ocean and climate sciences education outreach through a teacher professional development program. The purpose of the program is to bring the global oceans to inland audiences The focus of each year’s program is driven by participating scientists’ research interests. The Ocean and Climate Principles covered touched upon during the course include:

    EPOS 3 - The ocean is a major influence on weather and climate.
    EPOS 6 - The ocean and humans are inextricably connected.
    EPCS 1 - The Sun is the primary source of energy for Earth’s climate system.
    EPCS 2 - Climate is regulated by complex interactions among components of the Earth system.
    EPCS 5 - Our understanding of the climate system is improved through observations, theoretical studies and modeling.
    EPCS 6 - Human activities are impacting the climate system.

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    03.02.2010     Janice Mathisen, Susan Bullerdick, Kathy Sider, Polly Freeman, Tansy Clay, Andrea Anderson
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    COSEE-Ocean Learning Communities (COSEE-OLC) is a partnership among the University of Washington School of Oceanography, University of Washington College of Education, the Seattle Aquarium and the Ocean Inquiry Project. This unique collaboration is funded by the National Science Foundation. COSEE-OLC has developed a learning community of marine volunteer organizations, resource managers, University and State agency scientists and formal educators who through organized events/workshops have worked to increase ocean literacy and stewardship of the marine environment through public engagement. This learning community offers ocean/marine scientists opportunities to improve their outreach skills, spread the word about their research, and get help with research efforts.

    Through COSEE-OLC, ocean and marine scientists practice and receive feedback on communicating their research with diverse audiences, participate in the science of learning and invigorate their public outreach efforts. COSEE-OLC also provides scientists opportunities to connect with an army of marine volunteers and institutions eager to learn, participate in and spread the word about current research. The chance to meet, ask questions of, and clarify meaning with working scientists means that volunteers and staff can more effectively translate information and share it with the public through the thousands of people they reach on beaches, boats and in schools each year.

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    03.02.2010     Tansy Clay, Andrea Anderson, and Rick Keil
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    COSEE-Ocean Learning Communities (COSEE-OLC) experiments with strategies to catalyze and support a community of ocean scientists, learning science researchers, educators, and citizens interested in the marine environment. COSEE-OLC has experimented with adapting the poster session of scientific conferences as a tool for connecting ocean scientists and learning science researchers and their research with the public.
    The goals of our poster sessions are to:

    Connect citizens to current research.
    Provide scientists with feedback on their presentations.
    Increase scientist participation in COSEE-OLC events.

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    03.02.2010     Beth R. Campbell, Sara M. Lindsay, and Annette V. deCharon
    2010 Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology Meeting, Seattle, WA


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    Injury and regeneration are fascinating topics that students are eager to learn more about. This allure makes injury a great hook to introduce students to a broader set of biological and ecological concepts. We focus on marine infauna, such as polychaetes, because they are important “ecosystem engineers” that often lose tissue to predators or other disturbances. For example, they influence sediment chemistry, nutrient cycling, and microbial communities as they burrow, feed, defecate, and irrigate their tubes. Evidence suggests that injured infauna are less active while they regenerate and these reductions can have individual, habitat, and community consequences.

    Concept maps are a useful educational tool to examine the costs and benefits of injury and regeneration, particularly linking the impacts from individuals and ecosystems. Such maps effectively show these linkages and encourage exploration of the processes that control and connect the immediate effects of injury on individual infauna with larger scale habitat and ecosystem changes. Our goal is to expand on the resources that are currently available to middle, high school, and post secondary educators using the COSEE Ocean Systems (OS) Concept Linked Integrated Media Builder (CLIMB) to create an interactive concept map of how injury affects marine benthic invertebrates, communities, and ecosystems. Here we present our initial concept map of how infaunal injury affects marine benthic ecosystems with examples of multimedia content, introduce the COSEE-OS concept mapping tool, suggest inquiry based activities for the classroom, and invite our colleagues to begin building their own concept maps of the integrative biology of injury and regeneration.

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    03.02.2010     Carrie Armbrecht, Annette deCharon, Jennifer Graves, and Dr. Fei Chai
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    To communicate science effectively there are challenges scientsts should consider when trying to craft audience-appropriate messages. The use of concept maps, people as facilitators, and effective teaching strategies can help scientists communicate effectively.

    This study looks at challenges which can occur during message packaging and understanding. Specifically it focuses on the use of concept maps as an effective tool for creating audience appropriate packages. Concept mapping allows both specialists and learners to see connections among related concepts. It shows the big picture, while also allowing one to focus in on details. When a learner makes connections between concepts, her/his understanding of the material deepens. MORE >>
    02.26.2010     Elizabeth Vernon Bell, Carrie Thomas Ph.D., Lundie Spence Ph.D., Terri Kirby Hathaway, and Angela Bliss
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    The Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence – SouthEast (COSEE SE) develops strategies for engaging scientists and educators for increased ocean literacy. COSEE SE employs innovative methods at the pivotal junction of science and education to: 1) extend scientific research to the public 2) teach educators about the nature of science and 3) connect informal science education (ISE) facilities with research and formal education communities.

    The Ocean Sciences Education Leadership Institute (Institute), is a 6-day residential summer professional development opportunity that serves North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, and brings together regional scientists and educators. Since 2003, three major themes have been explored: southeastern climate change, undersea research/ocean observing technologies, and coastal/estuarine ecosystems. After the Institute, the educators transfer science concepts to 1) students through teacher designed lessons and 2) local peers through a 6-hour professional development event, Ocean Awareness Day (OAD). The OAD links COSEE SE, Institute scientists and educators with regional ISE facilities. Each OAD is coordinated by Institute educators and hosted at an ISE facility and serves as a multiplier of the Institute impact. Thus, the partnership between COSEE SE and the individual ISE facility extends ocean literacy to a regional audience.

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    01.20.2010     Joanna Woerner, Tina Bishop, Tim Carruthers, William Dennison, Cassie Gurbisz, and Laura Murray
    2010 Ocean Sciences Meeting, Portland, OR


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    An ever growing number of scientists recognize the need to increase awareness about ocean science research, especially in regard to policy initiatives on climate change. Howerver, scientists may find it difficult to reach an audience outside of their community. At the same time, educators are searching for accurate and engaging science education resources to inspire students to become interested in scientific discovery.

    Collaborations between scientist and educators can meet both of these needs and provide unlimited access for students to learn about science. If increased access to scientific knowledge requires research, focused objectives and a transfer of knowledge between scientists and educators, then scientist-educator fellowship teams are a way to bring the appropriate people together around a specific project that can help bring scientific knowledge to a broader audience.

    The scientist-educator fellowship teams, sponsored by COSEE-Coastal Trends, have an ocean science researcher, a 7th-12th grade educator, a graduate student, and an undergraduage student. Team members collaborate to develop web-based educational resources. These resources include lesson plans, online activities and assessments, self-contained visuals, and videos - resources that support outreach and broader impacts initiatives.

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